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union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem but to berlin is the point of arbitration for all of them so the question arises and this goes back to the geography with russia needing the buffer zone in eastern europe remember the collapse didn't indian security facing ray it faced invasions' with will lead vehicle lithuanians, french, german throughout history. so we're back with a regional power flashed with natural gas. a rich and wealthy germany, poland between them that has -- >> it has gas under that many get an energy power in the century. this is living in geography. your argument about russia and russia's in security would be that it's too flat. half the world's longitudes but it's indefensible, it runs north, south so they don't unite the country and had less people than bangladesh. 141 million people, bangladesh has more. so vladimir putin sent up near imperialism on the deepak geographical and security and that's how we should understand not as a madman hour
from russia. my wife abby and i adopted our son charlie from russia a number of years ago now. after visits to russia and as we were leaving the courthouse the day that our -- the court procedures were accomplished, we were in the car with people who had helped us with that adoption who represented an organization here in the united states, in this case the gladney organization in texas, and they got a call that four of their fellow organizations had just been decertified in russia, and they were decertified for some technical reason as their papers regarding all of the adoptions they had done were reviewed, and at least one error was found in one paper somewhere. mr. president, over the course of the next 12 months as every single agency came up -- and this is about six years ago -- as every single agency came up for review, every one of them had a problem that wound up with them being disqualified. at the end of that year, there wasn't a single american organization that could be helpful to an american family with a russian adoption because that was the policy the government decide
authoritarian countries and around the world may be as helpful for me to mention those. i did time in russia, china, egypt, venezuela and even a few more. but i'm looking out of the book and what i set out to do is look at the struggle between democrats and dictators. which you find this is a wonderful political science literature out there on the topic. but in fact, it's actually lived by people in the very concrete way on a day-to-day basis. just a couple hours before he came over here this morning, many people are profiled in russia were just arrested. this is a fluid stream of income late and i wanted to look at how these two sides are facing off against each other. one of the things i don't think we often realize is the battle between democracies and dictatorships going on today as opposed to the not so distant past is actually almost always die struggle between individuals. and so why did i choose the countries i chose? i chose them because these are some of the most sophisticated regimes. what you find as it's actually, i think you could guess this from 20 above and if you are in anyw
that russia is worried that it's hold on the eastern european economies is going to fail because we can now supply them with natural gas instead of russia being their sole supplier. in this environment subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago we thought that china and india and other emerging economies might sign onto emissions reductions. and, therefore, that if we reduced e many uses -- emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't take a position on whether manmade emissions cause global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india which make up 37% of the world's population are not doing so, we're not going to have any effect on global temperatures. and in the first chapter of the book, i talk about geoengineering solutions that nobel prides-winning scientist paul krugman thinks can reduce global temperatures if we just do it on our own such as spraying clouds with water or painting roofs white to reflect the sun's rays. what we're doing with the $12 billion that we're spending on alternative energy is pushing peop
was the beginning of the coup d'√Čtat, the soviet union. the cia spy plane was shot down over russia. the cia had suppressed a study showing the soviet antiaircraft missiles can now climb high enough to reach the u2, atlanta ike to believe the pilot would never be captured into a dive on the plane broke up or killed himself with a suicide pill. the russians captured the pilot, powers, khrushchev bloated and credit of the wicked american spies. that was the and. eisenhower was very depressed. i want to resign, he said his faithful assistant, when he came into the oval office after powers was captured and his cover story blown. ike bounced back. he always did, but after nearly eight years of constant attention he was exhausted. ike threatened to use nuclear weapons. he never told anyone whether he actually would use them. he could not, of course or his threat would no longer be credible. talk about the loneliness. ike me all about the burden, from the north african campaign in 1943 to d-day to the conquest of germany, and the liberation of europe. ike smoke four packs a day as a general. he quit co
friend was appointed ambassador minister to russia come first minister to russia and he couldn't speak french at the time french was not only the language of international diplomacy, it was also the language spoken in the russian court, they spoke french to each other. john quincy could and he asked john adams can you take john quincy adams with you to st. petersburg as the secretary at 16 years of age, and john quincy adams goes up with francis to st. petersburg and spends the year up there. it was too cold to venture out. he had this insatiable appetite for running. he studied david hume, the six volumes of edward gibbons decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, the great economic work. he kept studying latin and read cicero. he read english poets. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. a 69 was still studying on goal wrigley. i went to jail instead of harvard. of course a big difference. >> but i take it as a politician especially in our modern sense of the word he may have lacked a certain common touch. >> he had no common
in foreign languages or when the family friend, francis daniel was appointed ambassador, minister to russia, our first minister to russia, he couldn't speak french at the time french was not the language of international diplomacy. there's always the language spoken in the russian court. francis couldn't speak french. young john quincy could and asked john could he take john quincy adams within two st. petersburg as secretary of litigation is 16 years of age. john quincy adams goes up two st. petersburg and spends the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really venture out. so john quincy adams on his son had the sensational appetite for learning. on his own he studied it lame history of england, six volumes of edward gibbons, decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, great economic word. he kept studying latin. he read the latin poets in cicero and avenue. he read the english poet. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. at 16 i was still studying uncle wiggly. but i read it in latin because i went to heal instead o
to face. when russia, he had to meet them, take the measure, and make him his partner in avoiding war. the issue, ike wrote, in a smart letter to a friend in 1956, quote, is not merely man against man or nation against nation. it is man against war. in the summer of 1959, ike invited crus choof to the united states, and they went over the suburbs to see houses and cars, and he pretended to see just the rush hour traffic jams but asked to buy three hell cometters and a boeing 747. [laughter] he met marilyn monroe. ike invited him to camp david. where is this camp david, he asked? he was suspicious, wondering if the americans wanted to kidnap him. at camp david, ranted and threatened that the tanks would roll in berlin. the top aide wrote impasse on a piece of paper. ike took a nap and had an idea. ike's farm was close by. called his darnel, barbara, and told her to have the kids all spruced up on the porch of the farmhouse in 30 minutes. he brought him to meet them. ike's great insight about him was that he was a survivor. he survived hitler and stalin, after all. the kremlin leaders,
tie onin -- tycoon in 1998. and at this moment he was the richest man in russia, but russia had just experienced its default and devaluations. so he was in kind of a bad mood. and this is what he said to me about oligarchs and everybody else. if a man is not an oligarch, something is not right with him. everyone had the same starting conditions, everyone could have done it. and he really meant it, you know? it was very, very heartfelt. and he was particularly -- he was kind of criticizing himself in this because he had lost a couple of hundred million dollars because he had stupidly entrusted a nonoligarch, there therefore, not a true man, with running his bank, and this nonoligarch -- by definition, not a smart guy -- had the loss of a few hundred million bucks. but that is, you know, there's a little bit of that thinking in a lot of these guys, and it's interesting because i came across, i think there are very strong parallels, i won't have time to talk about all of them. but in my book i talk about the parallels of industrial revolution. and there's a line from andrew carnegie whi
, saudi arabia actors. is really also about china and russia on the one hand, and the united states and europe on the other. so we have three levels of stalemate. local, regional and international, simply because there's so much at stake. so a country like syria, or a regime like syria for the past 40 years have had these calculations in mind. so this is not to excuse the regime whatsoever. this is to understand, the outcomes of what we have been witnessing for the past several decades involve these kind of calculations that many of us don't take into account. >> and we've been talking with bassam haddad, "business networks in shyria: the political economy of authoritarian resilience" is the name of this book. it's published by stanford. professor haddad is also head of the middle eastern studies program here at george mason university. this is a booktv on c-span2. >> tell us what you think about our program this weekend. you can tweet us at booktv, comment on our facebook wall, or send us an e-mail. tv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> with just days left in this mont
arab ya and the united states and russia and the european countries. what happened in lebanon -- if left to themselves, lebanon -- which is another sad story -- they might have been able to compromise and come together as they did on a number of occasion before re '7s and '80s, and work things out somehow. find some sort of system and muddle through this. but as they say in real estate, location is everything. and lebanon being between syria and israel, and of course syria itself being on the border of israel, lebanon, iraq, south of turkey, you're not going to be -- you cannot be the switzerland over the middle east. are going to have outside influences which usually exacerbate the situation and lengthen the time of the civil war. >> and so let's talk a little bit now, shifting the perspective, to the personal connections that you have to the house of assad. i would love for you to give us a good feel for, who is this man who is the president and how did he change over the time that you've known him? seems like there was a definitive time around 2005-2006 that you say he shif
, england -- went back home for a bit, back to russia, impossible to ground the man at a time when the money that goes along with those kinds of states that's put to immediate use. we knew that 20 # million are affected by the floods, and we know that transparency international, 70% of the world bank money given for dam maintenance was siphoned off. it doesn't take anyone, really, to guess where that money went. you know, this is a president who was called mr. 10% in the first time, mr. 50% in the wife's second term, and now during his term, mr. 110%, and that's, you know, the corruption is not according to me or pakistani sources, but it's according to john burns of the new "new york times" that places the corruption at $2 billion to $3 billion. >> so you don't approve? >> i wouldn't vote for him, no. [laughter] >> this, of course, has been the struggle and the tragedy of pakistan over a long period of time that when something like democratic elections occur, the sighfullian leaderships that take office fail the mandate that brought them there, and they often fail in space that's pinched an
of modern totalitarianism, first not see germany and now communist russia. and on like chambers, we believe that the united states would eventually turn back the communist threat to western civilization, just as surely as it had done to the equally evil threat posed by not to germany. not, mind you, that we underestimated the might of the soviet military or the strength and the resolve of the anti anti-communist forces. against as both at home and abroad. in fact, there were times when we came close to a feeling that chambers and other conservative anti-communist like james vernon who wrote a book entitled suicide of the last, we feared that they might be right. for me, one especially discouraging occasion was the fight against ronald reagan's decision in 1983 to station medium-range misfiles in europe to counter the soviet buildup of similar misfiles on its side of the dividing line between its domain and the west. massive protests were planned here at home and all over the world with the biggest one scheduled for the aid to which over a million people from every country in western europe
the soviet union. i asked my teenage daughter, she says you know, what's wrong with russia? russia was the soviet union and she said what's that? it's a big thing in the late 80s and early '90s before it toppled. we were geared up to fight them and most of us have never really considered iraq or knew who saddam hussein was. after that war was over, which winning was a forgone conclusion, you you no? the terrorism thing caught us by surprise. we thought they were rabble-rousers and never gave them too much credit. interesting enough all the buildings in khobar were told by the bin laden construction company and they had the bin laden stamps on all of the buildings. how is that for irony? but after that things kind of changed and the world trade center bombings and september 11 of course, we all know what happened that day. i was actually flying that morning and had come back from the middle east from another
completely. what is on the agenda? some minor bill like exporting bill relating to a wheat deal with russia and some conservative republican senator from the midwest introduced an amendment that would limit the president's power and kennedy people are just prepared to let it go through. not johnson. he says i want that bill stopped. his exact words are i want that bill merger. he doesn't want it just defeated. he wants to defeated by enough to show congress there's a new president now and you can't treat him the same way you were -- you can't treat me the way you were treating him. he stays on and calls in his vote counter and they don't even know, they tell him they have a certain number of votes but johnson is the greatest vote counter. he counts the votes and realizes they don't. all night he stays on the telephone making calls to senators and the bill is murdered. johnson writes in his memoirs at that moment, the power of the federal government began flowing back to the white house. and it did. one of the things this book, "the passage of power," is about, really, is about how lyndon jo
in 1972 he wrote to the great empires in spain and russia, britain, each to to enter 50 years. in the empirical hegemony and the power leads to decadence and the short sleeves to short sleeves and generations from the exploration and exploitation to the decadence request for world approval to the welfare state and squabbles over inherited wealth and the notable feature he writes of the declining nations of the loss of physical energy. both recapitulate the human individual tendencies and like the individual human involved in the predictable directions the kunin light lived to be 120 years but no longer and will decatur the predictable stages as well the family. however wealthy and the state however powerful. and now we see we in america are at the outward end of the to hundred 50 years, and we see the signs positive. we passed through the ages of outburst conquest, commerce, of unscom into left and we've come to the age of decadence. this and all employers, she writes, can be identified by the defensiveness, pessimism, materialism, the welfare state, the dissolution of the arm
, that would not be the first time trouble in the 1990's coming of asia, russia. so we have double the ability to international shock that could bring the crisis on him even if we are in export of that part of the financial crisis. >> host: thank you for holding you're on book tv on c-span2. >> caller: are you uremia okay? >> host: we are listening. please go ahead, sir. >> caller: first off, i just realized i got neal's but from the library. i was on hold for six weeks. it's a popular book. my question as to why he mentioned that he is a democrat. his high level, i wonder how the place. is it important? as he does his work, is it on his forehead, oh, he is a democrat. what geithner deferred to him as opposed to republican? how does that play at that very high level of politics? >> guest: i would say that the only time a really benefited me in any way, shape or form was during the confirmation process. the fact that george w. bush had nominated a democrat for this gem sort of gave me a level of credibility that i was not -- for a person died would be a political guy, was the prosecutor. on the
into a global conflict lasting seven years, involve england, franch, austria, russia, prussia, and dozen other nations fighting for control over colonies in north america, africa, asia, and the seas in between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or tw
numbers were being sent to russia to die. when the germans surrendered and the japanese were pushed back to their home island, the american propensity to save the human lives while wasting cheaper bullets and bombs reached its zenith with the dropping of the two atomic bombs. virtually all of the relevant evidence, recent evidence from both american and japanese sources nowadays president harry truman's decision to drop both bombs. japanese leaders did not display the slightest acknowledgment of military reality, illustrated by the report of a doctor. japan's top atomic scientist who was sent down to the regime of the following day and he had to report back to the emperor. and he was asked was this an atomic bomb? yes, it's an atomic bomb. then came the line, how long till we get when? it's hardly the response of somebody looking for a way to surrender. truman intended to show japan that he would use any weapon at our disposal. there was no atomic diplomacy. he wanted to show the japanese that it was surrender or die. when japan 70, came the victory of the principles of american exceptio
of the barbra streisand classic on the cleared day icy-- i can see russia. and talked-about candidates and seems impossible but the then governor of illinois was mentioned rob flood of which -- the ugly of block a and hit seem to to hem a powerful appointment to which the appointment should make you rich but the plant turned out to have a glitch perhaps the fed said flipped a switch and so much for rob blob of which. in 2012 was a little concerned wonder two candidates were left over to your fans including romney when i did a poem about him yes, he is so slick of speech and garb he reminds us of ken of ken and barbie. quick to shed his regalia he may be lacking genitalia. [laughter] one but we had good candidates for car was concerned there was only one primary in 2008 i had to. we had people like rick perry like john edwards has beautiful hair. and a good time because they say the neath the space beneath the hair is. [inaudible] this book ends with the actual election. since then we have talked like the republicans have lost. i wrote a poem about that called the republican in soul-searching. we
. he calls russia rashawn evil empire. every day i called dana perino and evil person. i know you guys think she's adorable and she talks about that dog. [applause] you guys actually think jasper is a dog? that is an armenian man that she hired as an indentured serving and wearing a fur costume. all she does is go around central park and take pictures of this poor sweaty men man all over central park. it's disgusting. somebody has to tell the truth. lastly, ronald reagan was a charismatic leader who influence millions of people concerning freedom and individuality around the world and i think i and all of you your products is that. that is not a joke. [applause] i should stick to the joke thing. all of you look at me like, what was that about? anyway, so the book is kind of born of the reagan era. it's about people who pretend to be tolerant when in fact they are not at all and they use it as a weapon to shut you up. who was the first real target? it was ronald reagan. what was he portrayed as in the media? what kept him from talking about low taxes are free markets was he was describe
mchale gorbachev to tear down this wall. i like vodka. he called russia an evil empire. every day i call dana trio an evil person. i know you think she's adorable and she talks about that dog. why is. you guys actually think jasper is a dog? that is an armenian man that she hired as an indentured servant and wearing a fur cost to molly does around central park is take pictures of this sweaty man all over central park. discussing. somebody has to tell the truth. that is what i am here for. leslie ronald reagan was a charismatic leader who influenced millions of people, turning freedom and individuality around the world and i think i and all of you are products of that. that is not a joke. i should stick to the joke thing. all of you look at me like what was that about? so the book is kind of born from the reagan era. it is about people who pretend to be tolerant when in fact they are not at all in use tolerance as a weapon to shut you up. who was the first real target? ronald reagan. what was he portrayed as in the media? what kept you from talking about low taxes or free-market was being
, the ottoman empires, spain, russia, britain, each flourished for around 250 years, and this seems to be the space allotted for imperial he generalny. too long a period of power leads to decadence, so the empire goes from the pioneers to the innovators, to the bureaucrats, from exploration on exploitation to decadence, the quest for world approval, the welfare state and squabbles over inherited wealth. and a notable feature, he writes, of the declining nations is the loss of physical energy. he suggests, as does the bible, that the state of a human organism is no different than the family. both recapitulate human individual tendencies, and like the individual human, evolve in predictable directions. the human might, indeed can, live to be 120 years, but no longer, and will decay through predict blg stages as will the family, however well ty -- and the state, however powerful. and now we see we in america are at the outword end of sir john gloves' 250 years, and we see the signs. we have passed through the ages of outburst, conquest, commerce, affluence, intellect, and we've come to
, north korea, china, russia and so forth. i would imagine it's a considerably lower. >> did the policy wax and wane with new administration's? >> it did. the most was during the kennedy years. jack kennedy as i said was determined to do something that the cuba problem. he was obsessed, humiliated that the day. lyndon johnson can after kennedy and his obsession with vietnam so he declined precipitously. subsequent presidents such as gerald ford, jimmy carter made a very serious efforts to achieve a rapprochement with castro, quite the opposite of what kennedy was doing. so yes, cuba has waxed and waned and it's been a different kind of priority over these 50 years, so it is with american presidents. estimate on the reverse side, does cuba have good assets, did they have good assets in the u.s.? has the castro regime ever tried to assassinate a u.s
down this wall. i like about you. [laughter] -- vodka. >> he called russia and evil empire. everyday i call dana perino an evil person. do you guys actually think jasper is a dog? [laughter] that is an armenian man that she hired as an indentured servant, and wearing a fur costume and all she does run central park is take pictures of this poor, sweaty men all over central park. disgusting. somebody has to tell the truth. that's what i'm here for. lastly, ronald reagan was a charismatic leader who influenced millions of people concerning freedom and individuality around the world. and i think that all of you are products of that. it's not a joke. [applause] i should stick to the joke thing. all of you look at me like what was that about? anyway, so the book is kind of them has been born from the reagan era. it's about people who pretend to be tolerant when, in fact, they're not at all. the use tolerance as a weapon to shut you up. who was the first real target? ronald reagan. what was he portrayed as in immediate? what kept you from talk about low taxes or free markets was being describ
with so many countries like russia and south africa, to learn that the first encounter between europe and the new world, but between the conquistadors and into was over a book. with thomas jefferson and the wondrous discussion register. such a vibrant discussion. it is wonderful to know that it will go forward around the world. what we have learned is that the book culture is changing. although we all know, i think in our hearts, books provide a world of books which we have known for so long. to which we have dedicated our lives to visit did and has done from school to book from mouth to people. leather bound tomes to pocket books. i just finished writing a book which will come out next year. you know, libya would take a printing press on the battlefield and he would carry it along with the canon and the musket and the horses and cattle. there was a printing press and spanish would laugh at him. why was he lumbering through the jungle like this with a printing press. in the course of liberating six countries, he changed the language because he began to write in a kind of spam is very
in the last couple years the rise of state capitalism in china and russia and a number other countries. so the question becomes, how on this global environment would be state capitalism vigorously against each other for resources and for market and cheap labor. how does one bring standards within that timeframe we talked about to the breaks. china is really behaving internationally no different than the united states, great britain behave in prior centuries. as you say, we are running out of time and running out of resources. the kind of renewal, political renewal were talking about really has to be global in order for this to work because the u.s. based corporations doesn't fall on the global economy. so i'm imagining, is this overthrowing the wto and allowing the environmental sky rise are things that produce products for national legislation, winding operations operations -- what is a delicate a handle on that? [inaudible] >> i have so many peered to her three years ago paul kildee wrote a book, arguing that exactly the kind of results in terms of movement will not happen in this countr
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